May 7th, 2008

Well...

I'm off to former chief justice John Marshall's house.

I've always wanted to say that :)
Well...

George Washington in the Virginia State Capitol

Note the fence placed around his statue: it symbolizes the fact that even in death he is not released from duty to his country, and that as a nation we reserve the right to raise him from the dead should medical technology make such a feat possible.

Or at least that's what the volunteer tour guide told me before he walked away laughing.
George Washington in the Virginia State Capitol

A historic place

This is the old House of Delegates chamber in the Virginia State Capitol, where Chief Justice John Marshall presided over the famed Aaron Burr trial. A statue of Robert E. Lee (foreground) prevents the visitor from taking any kind of wideangle photograph of the room: by forcing any picture of this hall to be divided in twain, visitors are thereby reminded of how our country itself was once divided by the Civil War.

I learned that from the same tour guide. He has been very helpful.
A historic place

George Wythe

This gentleman is credited as being the first American law professor. As I cannot rule out the possibility that his statue will ask me a difficult question about torts I shall hastily take my leave.
George Wythe

The Confederate White House

Note the yellow "caution" tape and the flimsy chain blocking the entrance - clearly a feeble effort to prevent the South from rising again.
The Confederate White House

Robert E. Lee's headquarters tent

I just finished the tour of the Confederate White House. I was the only person on the tour, just as I was the only person in my tour of Marshall's house.
Robert E. Lee's headquarters tent